Mrs. McCullough's Third Grade Class


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Pictures from some of our skype session with classes in Lithuania, Kansas, and Texas for our Ginger Bread
STEM Project 
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 A video to help your child when learning about shapes: 




Our class song this year :) 



One of our math centers is to play Prodigy, Prodigy is a math game that evolves with your student as they learn new math skills. Students can also play this game at home!
   

Link to Prodigy:
https://www.prodigygame.com/Play/
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10 Ways to Improve Your Child's Math Skills

  1. Play cards and board games with your child. Simple games such as Go Fish and Crazy 8’s are a great way for young children to learn the value of numbers. More advanced games such as cribbage and Monopoly are excellent mental math motivational tools.
  2. Count change with your child and have him or her use money in real-life situations. Use nickels and dimes to have children count by increments of 5 and 10. For older children, have them play “cashier” and count back change to you after you “purchase” an item.
  3. Play number guessing games. Here is an example: I am thinking of a number between 1 and 100. It is more than 50. It is an even number. It is the product of 8 times 9.
  4. Cook and read recipes with your child. Baking cookies is a fun way for children to practice their fractions by using measuring cups and spoons. For older kids, teach fraction equivalency, i.e., How many fourths does it take to make one-half?
  5. Take your child shopping and point out sales wherever percentages are used. Explain to older children how to calculate the price of something marked 50% or 10% off. This also provides an excellent opportunity to teach rounding.
  6. Use your newspaper to find graphs and statistics. Discuss how to read and interpret a graph, and point out the different kids: line graph, pie chart, bar chart, histogram, etc.
  7. Have your child assist you in crafts such as woodworking or sewing. Use various measuring tools to show your child how to properly measure an item to the nearest inch. Measurement is the mathematical area in which children tend to be least proficient on standardized tests. Have older children find the area and perimeter of an object.
  8. Fill a jar with jellybeans and have your child estimate how many there are. After their initial estimate, take out 10 and allow them to amend their guess. When you count the actual number, show your child how to count in increments of two.
  9. Pretend to shop using an advertisement. Given them 50 “pretend dollars” and have them pick out the things they want to buy and figure out how much money they would have left over. Hint: A toy ad is especially motivating for young children.
  10. Use dice to do mental addition and teach probability. Ask your child, “Am I more likely to roll a 7 or a 12?” For a challenge, use more than two dice. You can list all of the possible combinations on a piece of paper.

As you try these activities with your child, remember to be positive, patient and encouraging. You want your child to understand that math is both fun and useful. This understanding will provide a firm foundation of mathematical confidence and proficiency.



We had another Donors Choose funded!  Thank you to everyone who supports our classroom! 
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Donors Choose projects for the 2017-2018 school year 

Our Classroom Community…Online!

What a wonderful community of learners we have in our classroom this year! I’m so excited to help our students learn and grow.

I have registered our classroom on DonorsChoose.org, an amazing website where individuals can contribute to public schools. Throughout the year, I will post requests for resources that will help make your child’s time at school even more engaging, dynamic, and enriching.

Please spread the word about our classroom page (and contribute if you can)!

 

https://www.donorschoose.org/we-teach/2421121/?active=true

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10 Ways to Keep Your Child Organized

1. Use Checklists-  Help your child get into the habit of keeping a "To Do" list.  Use checklists to post assignments, household chores, and reminders about what materials to bring to class. 

This website from Scholastic will create really neat looking to do lists that you can fill out yourself or print in different formats.  

2. Organize Homework Assignments-  Before beginning a homework session, encourage your child to number assignments in the order of which they should be done.  Your child should start with an assignment that is not too long or difficult, but avoid saving the hardest or longest assignments for last.

3. Designate a Study Space- Your child should study in the same place every night.  This doesn't have to be a bedroom, but it should be a quiet place with few distractions.  All school supplies and materials should be nearby.  If your child wants to study with you nearby too, you will be better able to monitor their progress and encourage good study habits.

4. Set a Designated Study Time- Your child should know that a certain time everyday is reserved for studying and doing homework. The best time is not usually right after school.  Most children benefit from having some time to unwind first.  Include your child in making this decision.  Even if he/she doesn't have assigned homework, the time should be spent reviewing, practicing math facts, or reading.

5. Keep an Organized Binder and Folder-  Help your child keep track of papers that are sent home by organizing them into a labeled binder or folder.  This will allow your child to review the material and prepare for tests and quizzes. 

 

6.  Conduct a Weekly Clean-Up- Encourage your child to sort through his/her backpack and notebooks on a weekly basis.  Old worksheets and papers should be organized in a separate file at home. 

7. Check Your Child's Binders and Folders- Although not on purpose, children sometimes forget what is in their Take Home Folders.  Please try to go through their backpacks and check to make sure that they are writing down and completing all assignments.  Check their assignments for accuracy.  Checking up on your child keeps them in check, so that they will be mindful that this is is something that you want them to do, and will be checking for at home, as well as my checking at school. 

8. Keep a Master Calendar- Keep a large wall-sized calendar at the house that lists the family's commitments, schedules for extracurricular activities, days off from school, and major events at home and school. 

Scholastic has a great Calendar Maker that you can fill in and print our in many colorful formats.  

9. Prepare for the Day Ahead- Before your child goes to bed, he/she should pack schoolwork and books in a backpack.  This will cut down on morning confusion and allow your child to prepare for the day ahead.

10. Provide Needed Support While Your Child is Learning to Become More Organized- Help your child develop organizational skills by photocopying schedules and checklists and taping them to the fridge.  Gently remind him/her to fill in calendar dates and keep papers organized.  Most important, set a good example. 

10 Ways to Keep Your Child Organized

1. Use Checklists-  Help your child get into the habit of keeping a "To Do" list.  Use checklists to post assignments, household chores, and reminders about what materials to bring to class. 

This website from Scholastic will create really neat looking to do lists that you can fill out yourself or print in different formats.  

2. Organize Homework Assignments-  Before beginning a homework session, encourage your child to number assignments in the order of which they should be done.  Your child should start with an assignment that is not too long or difficult, but avoid saving the hardest or longest assignments for last.

3. Designate a Study Space- Your child should study in the same place every night.  This doesn't have to be a bedroom, but it should be a quiet place with few distractions.  All school supplies and materials should be nearby.  If your child wants to study with you nearby too, you will be better able to monitor their progress and encourage good study habits.

4. Set a Designated Study Time- Your child should know that a certain time everyday is reserved for studying and doing homework. The best time is not usually right after school.  Most children benefit from having some time to unwind first.  Include your child in making this decision.  Even if he/she doesn't have assigned homework, the time should be spent reviewing, practicing math facts, or reading.

5. Keep an Organized Binder and Folder-  Help your child keep track of papers that are sent home by organizing them into a labeled binder or folder.  This will allow your child to review the material and prepare for tests and quizzes. 

 

6.  Conduct a Weekly Clean-Up- Encourage your child to sort through his/her backpack and notebooks on a weekly basis.  Old worksheets and papers should be organized in a separate file at home. 

7. Check Your Child's Binders and Folders- Although not on purpose, children sometimes forget what is in their Take Home Folders.  Please try to go through their backpacks and check to make sure that they are writing down and completing all assignments.  Check their assignments for accuracy.  Checking up on your child keeps them in check, so that they will be mindful that this is is something that you want them to do, and will be checking for at home, as well as my checking at school. 

8. Keep a Master Calendar- Keep a large wall-sized calendar at the house that lists the family's commitments, schedules for extracurricular activities, days off from school, and major events at home and school. 

Scholastic has a great Calendar Maker that you can fill in and print our in many colorful formats.  

9. Prepare for the Day Ahead- Before your child goes to bed, he/she should pack schoolwork and books in a backpack.  This will cut down on morning confusion and allow your child to prepare for the day ahead.

10. Provide Needed Support While Your Child is Learning to Become More Organized- Help your child develop organizational skills by photocopying schedules and checklists and taping them to the fridge.  Gently remind him/her to fill in calendar dates and keep papers organized.  Most important, set a good example.